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The 5 Biggest Continuous Improvement Challenges and How the Factory Operating System Solves Them All

1. Resistance from the Shop Floor and middle managers
As any Lean or Continuous Improvement (CI) practitioner can attest to, the first problem you encounter while trying to drive changes is resistance from the shop floor – and then the management team. The resistance is often created by a fear of change and people being pushed out of their comfort zones. It also arises from conflicting agendas.

Exclusive Interview with Norman Bodek, Pioneer in American Lean Manufacturing Movement

In this exclusive interview with Manuficient Consulting, Norman Bodek shares some of the extraordinary details of his career as a one of the pioneers in the American Lean Manufacturing movement. Norman is a publisher, professor, and author who has published hundreds of Japanese management books in English and other languages. Most recently, Norman co-authored the Harada Method, a step-by-step process for setting and achieving personal and corporate goals.

Whitepaper: Why Most American Continuous Improvement Initiatives Fail

It has been estimated that 70% of Continuous Improvement efforts such as Lean, Six Sigma, Agile Manufacturing and others fail to meet expectations. This happens for two primary reasons:

1) The Factory’s Operating Systems lack sufficient structure and are not conducive for Continuous Improvement. The Operating System is the array of policies, processes, people, and technology that are used to execute operations.

2) CI requires a high degree of Operational Discipline that, in the absence of a well-structured Operating System, is nearly impossible to cultivate.